11/17/2017

John Wetton & Geoff Downes' iCon Zero Now Available on CD and Download!


iCon Zero is a revised presentation of the Wetton/Downes album and is a precursor to their iCon series of albums. It is essentially a collection of tracks mostly recorded in the late 1980s through the time of their brief reformation in 1990.

The original version of the album was released in 2002 and in retrospect seemed like an iCon album from a previous era, so both John and Geoff readily agreed to it being brought into the iCon family. John came up with the name Zero, and both John and Geoff approved the new front cover artwork.

The album has received a 2017 remaster and includes two previously unreleased bonus tracks.

Geoff Downes reminisced about this time period in their joint career with these comments: Icon Zero brings back many fond memories of working with John back in the early-mid 80s. Despite being the principal writers for Asia, we both felt there was at least one other string to our bow. This manifested itself in later years as the Icon project, and this album is an insight into the inner workings of our early relationship, not just as members of Asia, but also as songwriters. These recordings were made largely at weekends when we rented demo studios to try out our ‘other’ ideas and simply - have some fun time away from the pressures of the music business. Most of these songs were put together in a few hours, and written on the fly. Then, they were recorded straight down that same day. One great aspect of this was, we always seemed came up with something new, and as the inspiration flowed it was captured there and then even in its embryonic form. 

Sadly John Wetton passed away in January 2017, but this release was already on the cards, with his Estate and Geoff Downes approving it going ahead as originally planned.

Geoff Downes had these further comments about his late bandmate: “John was a genius in every sense of the word, and I am most privileged to have been a big part of his career. The Icon project in itself stands alone as a complete cycle of our work together, and this album (Icon Zero) displays an important part of that development. The great John Wetton’s unique presence can be felt on every note and lyric of these songs. Please enjoy.”

iCon Zero will be followed by definitive edition re-releases of the subsequent three iCon albums, with bonus tracks, during 2018 with Geoff Downes’ personal approval.

To purchase John Wetton & Geoff Downes iCon Zero:
Amazon CD: http://geni.us/icon0
iTunes: http://geni.us/icon0dig

Press inquiries: Glass Onyon PR, PH: 828-350-8158 (US), glassonyonpr@gmail.com

Progressive Rock Review: Alan Parsons Project-Eye In The Sky 35th Anniversary Box Set

Release Date: December 1, 2017
Label: Sony
Website



I think it is appropriate to kick off this review of the Alan Parson’s Project Eye In The Sky 35th Anniversary Box Set with an explanation of what encompasses this great tribute to this progressive rock classic.

A total of 3 CDs and a Blu Ray Disc:



CD1: Original Album Expanded + bonus tracks
 

CD2:Eric Woolfson's Songwriting Diaries
CD3: Previously Unreleased Bonus Material


Disc 4: 5.1 Surround Sound and Stereo HD version of the original album on Blu-ray.

Also included are 2 vinyl LPs of the original album recorded at half speed on four sides at 45rpm at Abbey Road Studios by Miles Showell, a flexi-disc replica of an original 1982 promo (remember getting those in magazines long ago?), a 60-page hardcover book featuring newly-written essays, previously unreleased images recently discovered in Eric Woolfson’s personal archive and new interviews with many of the musicians who recorded the tracks on the album, an Eye in the Sky 1982 replica poster and postcard, a gold-foil Eye of Horus stamp on the front of the box and more.

Most people that walk this earth have heard” Sirius” one time or another. It was dubbed as the Michael Jordan era Chicago Bulls theme song and then started to find its way into many other sporting events all over the world. In fact, I just heard it recently on a commercial.  It is a superb instrumental curtain opener that melts into the lead off album track. The aesthetics are superb and the first thing that strikes you as “quality” is the gold stamped Eye of Horus on the outer sleeve of the box. 






Eye In The Sky was first released in 1982 and I remember it well. I had the cassette then eventually got the CD and now I possess the grandest version of them all. One thing to keep in mind, for the uninitiated, is that the Alan Parsons Project was very successful several years before this amazing album was released. It was part of the recordings that ushered in the digital revolution of recordings. At the time, that was a new wonder and now it’s just history. I think it is taken for granted by most of us, well those that can remember that far back or were even alive for that matter. Technology moves so fast today you don’t have time to really appreciate it before it is updated or completely changed.

There is so much to enjoy in this lavish box set. So, I had to break it down section by section to get the full-on effect of such a complex recording with all the new materials, pictures, artist notes, track developments and the several formats offered. The first thing that got my attention and great interest was the bonus track disc. What made it so interesting was how I could hear the beginnings of tracks. For instance, one track was with just acoustic guitar or Eric Woolfson humming. Although just a snippet it was a rare look into the very beginnings of a track. I got a few tastes of what it is like for an artist that starts from scratch with an album. I worked with a few folks, taking basic bare bones ideas and then gradually adding some meat.  It was an eye-opening experience, adding the instruments to get to the point where it stands as one solid piece of work. To be involved in that process is quite amazing and it gives you an appreciation and respect for the recording process that you never had. So, to take in the process of a musical genius like Alan Parsons and his main partner Eric Woolfson (who passed in 2009), really was quite a complete musical experience. CD2 Eric Woolfson’s Songwriting Diaries (Previously Unreleased) really gives a window into the beginnings of a song and Eric’s process.  This is also part of the accompanying book.

Then there is the pristine 180-gram LP’s that were remastered to play at 45 rpms to push the original tapes to their limit and produce the best possible sound on vinyl. I love vinyl but it seems like it ends much too soon, especially when you love an album like I do this one. I can’t seem to hear this music enough, I enjoy it that much and always have. When you hear the term “timeless” as a reference point, it is usually directly connected to artists like The Beatles and Elvis, however I have to give the nod to Alan Parsons on this particular release. This music sounds as fresh and invigorating as when I first heard it. In fact, it sounds better than ever listening to it remastered and on a 5.1 surround sound system.

The coffee table book is a nice addition to the set as well. It is jam packed with information from the people that recorded the music and remastered it. It is a great addition to read while listening. It brings a new picture into focus of what you are listening to like never before. It goes together like a hand in glove.



I have enjoyed many of the Parson’s releases over the years, in particular Turn of a Friendly Card and Tales of Mystery and Imagination. These were very different recordings however they are at the top of the list of my favorites from the Parson’s catalog coming right after Eye In The Sky. I think most music relates to different times of your life and for me it was one of the more exciting and transformational. I was discovering new music and traveling all over the world with the Navy. It is a time that matured me in ways I could have never imagined. Music was my best friend while out to sea for long periods of time. There was a peace and satisfaction I found on those open seas, and those feelings remain unmatched to this day. That is the joy I feel while reflecting upon my life listening to this amazing music.

If you don’t understand how this album came together after listening to all this music and reading the book then I suggest you do it more than once, you may have to anyway. My thought is, let’s give it another whirl, love it!

So, who knows what’s next from Mr. Parsons? Perhaps a world tour of this album presented on the stage fully backed by an orchestra with choreography and color? Or perhaps Cirque du Soleil performing with the music as their soundtrack? In the meantime, lets enjoy this great music presented in this box set.

5/5 Stars


Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck
November 17, 2017

Founder of:

Review Provided By Prog Rock Music Talk
Tracks:
 


CD1 Original Album & Expanded Bonus Tracks
(originally released 2007)


1. Sirius

2. Eye In The Sky

3. Children Of The Moon
4. Gemini

5. Silence And I

6. You’re Gonna Get Your Fingers Burned
7. Psychobabble

8. Mammagamma

9. Step By Step

10. Old And Wise
Bonus Tracks
11. Sirius (Demo)

12. Old And Wise (Eric Woolfson Vocal)
13. Any Other Day (Studio Demo)

14. Silence And I (Eric Woolfson Vocal)
15. The Naked Eye

16. Eye Pieces (Classical Naked Eye)

CD2 – Eric Woolfson’s Songwriting Diaries
(Previously Unreleased)

1.    Eye in the Sky (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 1)
2.    Eye in the Sky (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 2)
3.    Eye in the Sky (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 3)
4.    Eye in the Sky (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 4)
5.    Children of the Moon (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 1)
6.    Children of the Moon (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 2)
7.    Gemini (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 1)
8.    Gemini (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 2)
9.    Gemini (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 3)
10.  Gemini & Silence and I (Eric’s Songwriting Diary)
11.  Silence and I (Eric’s Songwriting Diary)
12.  Cooper’s Theme/ Silence and I chord beginnings (Eric’s Songwriting Diary)
13.  Cooper’s Theme/ Silence and I beginnings (Eric’s Songwriting Diary)
14.  Silence and I/ Fly Away  (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 1)
15.  Silence and I/ Fly Away (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 2)
16.  Old and Wise (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 1)
17.  Old and Wise (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 2)
18.  Old and Wise (Eric’s Songwriting Diary 3)


CD3 PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED BONUS MATERIAL & Single Edits

1.  Eye In The Sky (Ian 12-string Acoustic Guitar Out Take)
2.  Sirius and Eye In The Sky (Early Rough Mix)
3.  Eye In The Sky (Eric Demo Verses - No Lyrics)  
4.  Children Of The Moon (12-string Acoustic Guitar & Marching Band Snare Drum)
5.  Children Of The Moon (Early Rough Mix With Eric Demo Vocal)
6.  Gemini (Chris Rainbow Vocal Harmonies)
7.  Silence And I (Orchestral Take With Eric Demo Vocal)
8.  You're Gonna Get Your Fingers Burned (Rough Mix Section - Different Guitar Solo)
9.  You're Gonna Get Your Fingers Burned (Rough Mix with Alan Demo Vocal - Few Lyrics)
10. Psychobabble (Orchestral Take)
11. Psychobabble (Rough Mix With Eric Demo Vocal)
12. Step By Step (12-string Acoustic Guitars)
13. Step By Step (Rough Mix Backing Track - Extended Intro)
14. Old and Wise (Chris Rainbow Beach Boys Experiment)
15. Old & Wise (Eric Piano Track)
16. Eye in the Sky (Single Edit)
17. Old and Wise (Single Edit)
18. Psychobabble (Single Edit)

DISC 4 (BLU-RAY)

5.1 Surround Sound Mix (2017) 
Stereo HD version (1982)

1. Sirius

2. Eye In The Sky

3. Children Of The Moon
4. Gemini

5. Silence And I

6. You’re Gonna Get Your Fingers Burned
7. Psychobabble

8. Mammagamma

9. Step By Step

10. Old And Wise


VINYL (at 45 rpm)

Vinyl 1 Side 1
Sirius

Eye In The Sky
Children Of The Moon

Vinyl 1 Side 2

Gemini

Silence And I

Vinyl 2 Side 1

You’re Gonna Get Your Fingers Burned
Psychobabble

Vinyl 2 Side 2
Mammagamma
Step By Step
Old & Wise


FLEXIDISC

Excerpts from Eye in the Sky:
Sirius
Eye in the Sky
Psychobabble
Old and Wise

The Ed Palermo Big Band Releases The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren, a Dizzying and Ingenious Reinvention of Music by Frank Zappa and Todd Rundgren!


Featuring Zappa Vocal Legend Napoleon Murphy Brock!

Ed Palermo may have gained an international following with his ingenious orchestral arrangements of Frank Zappa tunes, but he’s hardly a one-trick pony. Earlier in the year, the saxophonist released an uproarious double album The Great Un-American Songbook Volumes 1 & 2, a project celebrating an expansive roster of songs by successive waves of British invaders, from the Beatles, Rolling Stones and Jeff Beck to King Crimson, Traffic, and Jethro Tull.

With his new big band project, slated for release on Cuneiform Records on October 6, 2017, Palermo is back on his home turf, but the landscape feels strange and uncanny. He’s reclaiming the Zappa songbook, filtering Frank through the emotionally charged lens of the polymathic musical wizard Todd Rundgren in a wild and wooly transmogrification, The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren. Working with the same stellar cast of players, Palermo somehow captures the essence of these iconoclastic masters, making Zappa Zappier and Todd more Rundgrenian.

He sees the Zappa and Rundgren as embodying a ying and yang approach to life that played an essential role in helping him navigate the minefields of teenage angst in the 1960s. “For most of my high school days my favorite musicians were Zappa and Todd Rundgren,” Palermo says. “Rundgren had his songs about self-pity, which were exactly what I needed back then. I’d go out with a girl and whatever party I brought her to she’d go and hang out with another dude. Todd understood. At the same time, Zappa had these snarky songs like ‘Broken Hearts are for Assholes.’ It was tough love. You gotta broken heart? Deal with it. Todd Rundgren’s music was there to give you a hug. I wanted to contrast the hard-bitten Zappa followed by a bleeding heart Rundgren ballad.”

Though the title suggests a forced merger, The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren doesn’t mashup the oeuvres of the two masters. Rather, the album mostly alternates between the composers, creating a deliciously dizzying whipsaw as the two diametrical stances sometimes blur or even switch. Zappa’s soaring fanfare “Peaches En Regalia” is more inspirational than smarmy, with a particularly eloquent alto sax solo by Cliff Lyons, while a brisk and forthright version of Rundgren’s “Influenza” showcases the muscular lyricism of violinist Katie Jacoby, one of the orchestra’s essential voices.

Palermo reaches deep into the Rundgren songbook for “Kiddie Boy,” a stinging blues from 1969’s Nazz Nazz, the seminal second release by his underappreciated band Nazz (an album which originally bore the Zappaesque title Fungo Bat). Drawing directly from the maestro’s original horn arrangement, Palermo displays some impressive guitar work on a vehicle for Bruce McDaniel’s blue-eye vocals. Napoleon Murphy Brock delivers a poker-faced rendition of Zappa’s surreal “Montana,” the tune that turned a generation on to the lucrative potential of floss farming, and McDaniel and Brock join forces on Rundgren’s deliriously silly “Emperor of the Highway,” an homage to Gilbert and Sullivan.

The contrasting sensibilities of the Zundgrens comes into sharp focus in the center of the album. While Palermo has recorded Zappa’s “Echidna’s Arf (Of You)” this time he replaces the horns with McDaniel’s intricately layered vocals via the miracle of multi-tracking. From Zappa’s playfully odd metered work out the big band saunters into Rundgren’s greatest ballad “Hello It's Me,” an arrangement for McDaniel’s most impassioned crooning based on the original version from 1968 album Nazz (not the hit from his solo Something/Anything? album).

Tenor saxophonist Bill Straub swaggers through Rundgren’s “Wailing Wall,” which is sandwiched between two slices of Zappa at his snarky best, “Big Swifty Coda” and “Florentine Pogen,” another superb feature for Brock. Palermo spotlights a dark and wondrous Zappa obscurity with “Janet's Big Dance Number,” a brief piece recovered from 200 Motels featuring Ben Kono’s noir tenor solo. From that unified hedgehogian arrangement Palermo unleashes the multifarious fox on Rundgren’s “Broke Down and Busted,” a portmanteau arrangement that touches on Rundgren’s “Boat on the Charles,” the Ramsey Lewis hit “The ‘In’ Crowd,” Zappa’s “Brown Shoes Don’t Make It,” and even traces of Steely Dan’s “Pretzel Logic.” It’s a tour de force that feels like stream of consciousness journey, though the id truly emerged on the closing hidden track. In what has become a Palermo tradition, he includes yet another version of an enduring lament about the difficulties of relationships, arranged this time in Nazzian style by McDaniel.

The seamless ease with which Palermo and his crack crew navigate between the Zappa and Rundgren shouldn’t come as a surprise. Over the years Zappa’s music has proven supremely pliable in Palermo’s capable hands, as evidenced further by a recent concert at Iridium that paired his songs with standards indelibly linked to Ol’ Blue Eyes (is there an album The Adventures of Zinatra in the future?). Everything he brings into the big band is a labor of love.

“Todd Rundgren holds a very special place in my heart,” Palermo says. “I realized I was in love with my girlfriend (now wife) listening to his album Something/Anything? It was about 2 years ago doing our regular hit at The Falcon that I decided to have Zodd Zundgren night. A lot of people who like the music of Zappa also like Rundgren and Steely Dan, but there are enough Steely Dan cover bands out there.”

Born in Ocean City, New Jersey on June 14, 1954, Palermo grew up in the cultural orbit of Philadelphia, which was about an hour drive away. He started playing clarinet in elementary school, and soon turned to the alto saxophone. He also took up the guitar, and credits his teenage obsession with Zappa to opening his ears to post-bop harmonies and improvisation.

Palermo caught the jazz bug while attending DePaul University, and took to the alto sax with renewed diligence inspired by Phil Woods, Cannonball Adderley, and Edgar Winter (the subject of an upcoming EPBB project). Before he graduated he was leading his own band and making a good living as a studio player recording commercial jingles. But like so many jazz musicians he answered New York’s siren call, moving to Manhattan in 1977. After a year of playing jam sessions and scuffling Palermo landed a coveted gig with Tito Puente, a four-year stint that immersed him in Afro-Cuban music.

An encounter with trumpeter Woody Shaw’s septet at the Village Vanguard in the late 1970s stoked his interest in writing and arranging for larger ensembles, and by the end of the decade he had launched a nine-piece rehearsal band with five horns. Between Don Sebesky’s well-regarded book The Contemporary Arranger and advice from Dave Lalama and Tim Ouimette, “I got a lot of my questions answered and I’ll love them forever,” Palermo says. “Then the real education was trial and error. I lived in a little apartment with no TV or furniture. All I had was a card table, and once a week I’d rehearse my nonet, then listen to the cassette of the rehearsal and make all the changes.”

Palermo made his recording debut in 1982, an impressive session featuring heavyweights such as David Sanborn, Edgar Winter and Randy Brecker. As a consummate studio cat and sideman, he toured and recorded with an array of stars, including Aretha Franklin, Eddie Palmieri, Celia Cruz, Lena Horne, Tony Bennett, Mel Tormé, Lou Rawls, Melba Moore, The Spinners, and many others. As an arranger, he’s written charts for the Tonight Show Band, Maurice Hines, Eddy Fischer, and Melissa Walker. Employed frequently by bass star Christian McBride for a disparate array of projects, Palermo has written arrangements for a James Brown concert at the Hollywood Bowl, a Frank Sinatra tribute featuring Kurt Elling, Seth McFarland, and John Pizzarelli, and a 20-minute medley of Wayne Shorter tunes for the New Jersey Ballet.

Palermo had been leading his big band for more than a decade before the Zappa concept started coming together. Inspired by electric guitar master Mike Keneally, who performed with Zappa on some of his final concerts before his death in 1993, Palermo decided to arrange a program of 12 Zappa tunes. When the time came to debut the material at one of the band’s regular gigs at the Bitter End in early 1994, a sold-out crowd greeted the band.

He earned international attention with the ensemble’s 1997 debut The Ed Palermo Big Band Plays Frank Zappa on Astor Place Records, which received a highly-prized 4-star review from DownBeat. With Palermo’s brilliant arrangements and soloists such as Bob Mintzer, Chris Potter, Dave Samuels, Mike Stern, and Mike Keneally, the album made an undisputable case for the Zappa jazz concept. In 2006 he released another collection of Zappa arranged for his jazz big band, called Take Your Clothes Off When You Dance, on Cuneiform, thus beginning an ongoing collaboration with that label. While Palermo has written more than 300 Zappa charts, he’s cast an increasingly wide net for material. Recent releases like 2014’s Oh No! Not Jazz!!, 2016’s One Child Left Behind and 2017’s The Great Un-American Songbook Volumes 1 & 2 - all on Cuneiform and all recipients of DownBeat’s coveted 4-star ratings - featured a bountiful selection of his original compositions and material by composers not named Frank Zappa.

Nothing demonstrates the ensemble’s ongoing vitality better than the stellar cast of players, with longtime collaborators such as violinist Katie Jacoby, baritone saxophonist Barbara Cifelli, drummer Ray Marchica, and keyboardist Ted Kooshian. Many of these top-shelf musicians have been in the band for more than a decade, and they bring wide-ranging experience, expert musicianship and emotional intensity to Palermo’s music.

The band’s following continues to expand with its monthly residency at Iridium and bi-monthly gigs at The Falcon. In addition, performances (some headlining) at jazz festivals across the USA are winning new fans of all ages for the band. Palermo’s profile in the jazz press is also rising fast, with articles and feature stories appearing this past year in such publications as Jazz Times and Jazziz. Regarding recordings, albums by The Ed Palermo Big Band have been critically acclaimed and also embraced by the general public-jazz and rock fans alike. Palermo has already recorded dozens of new tracks for The Great Un-American Songbook Volumes 3 & 4, and is hoping Zodd Zundgren helps introduce Rundgren’s ingenious, heartfelt music to a new generation.

To purchase Ed Palermo's The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren:
http://a.co/30Oggdq
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-adventures-of-zodd-zundgren/id1281745553
https://cuneiformrecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-adventures-of-zodd-zundgren
http://www.waysidemusic.com/Music-Products/Palermo-Ed-The-Adventures-Of-Zodd-Zundgren__Rune-spc-440.aspx

For more information on The Ed Palermo Big Band
http://www.palermobigband.comhttp://www.facebook.com/palermobigband - Twitter: @palermobigband
http://www.cuneiformrecords.com - Twitter: @cuneiformrecord

Press inquiries: Glass Onyon PR, PH: 828-350-8158, glassonyonpr@gmail.com

11/15/2017

Funktronic Icon DĀM-FUNK Remixes Track From New Todd Rundgren Album!


Los Angeles, CA - When legendary producer/songwriter Todd Rundgren went looking for special guests to collaborate with on his newest album White Knight (released 5/12/17 by Cleopatra Records) one of the more surprising yet enormously successful choices was electro R&B superstar DāM-FunK. The two collaborated on the stellar track “I Got Your Back,” fusing Rundgren’s jazz art rock with DāM’s ultra smooth e-piano grooves. Now, DāM returns to the track and offers up a new vision of their collaboration, a “Re-Freak” that adds more bottom heavy synths and new vocals sung by DāM. The result is a delight for fans of both Todd and DāM and is currently available on all digital platforms courtesy of Cleopatra Records.

About their collaboration, DāM had this to say, “Working with one of my heroes in music was a genuine pleasure. His progressive mind when it comes to all things music, without losing his soul in it, is such an inspiration to me and in what I humbly try to contribute to music listeners and aspire to. As the song says, ‘I got your back, Todd.’”

As a bonus, the digital single will come with a special “b-side” - the first downloadable release of Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’s remix of their Rundgren collab “Deaf Ears!”

Fresh off his latest run with Ringo Starr which ends tomorrow, November 16, Todd continues his “White Knight” headline tour beginning November 17 and ending New Year’s Eve at the Saban Theater in Beverly Hills. For more info on the tour, visit: http://www.todd-rundgren.com/tr-tour.html

Track List:
1. I Got Your Back (Dam-Funk Re-Freak)
2. Deaf Ears (Nine Inch Nails Mix)

Stream the digital single: http://open.spotify.com/album/6WKHsJIP1FNJaRw8OewNIo

Press inquiries: 
Glass Onyon PR
Billy James
PH: 828-350-8158
glassonyonpr@gmail.com

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Los Angeles CA 90025

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11/14/2017

New Age-Pop-Neo Classical: Unleashed Dreams-Dare To Dream

Release Date: September 1, 2017
Label: L.Walker International Ltd. Paddisongs Publishing Ltd.

Neoclassicism was born in Rome in the mid-18th century and it is still alive and well today. One look at the cover of the recent Unleashed Dreams recording Dare To Dream brings many different images together. Like the canvas of a great artist, the colors flow and merge to create thoughts and images where modern and times past intersect.

Looking at the art work on the cover of this CD invokes deep thought meditation and as it pulls the thoughts and vibrations from the mind of the subject (as on the cover) ...the words and music tell a story of love and inspiration.

The two anchor artists are Lindsey Gaye Walker (singer/songwriter, lead and background vocals) and Sean Michael Paddison (composer, songwriter, producer, pianist, background vocals and instrumentation). They have a few friends that join in this celebration of life and triumph as well. Every contributor made a difference and put their own stamp on this project.

This was a nice and welcome change from the norm for this listener. 99% of the new age music I listen to is instrumental, which I love, however hearing these amazing vocals and music come together was a special treat. The meaning of it all is so uplifting and spiritual. All I could think of when I looked at the cover was Michelangelo and The Sistine Chapel ceiling. What a miracle all of that artistry was and the miracle of this music and the images took me there. That my good people is a gift that multiplies for those that choose to listen.

Dare To Dream was like a breath of fresh air and a ray of sunshine that put a nice cap to the end of my day. The fact that I had a chance to listen, feel and let the music move me to write these words was yet another miracle. A higher power channeled within can bring change through music.

The mixture of vocal and instrumental tracks keeps it all interesting and thought provoking. Yes indeed, music is defined perfection in motion. With that I leave the rest to each individual listener.

5/5 Stars

Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck
November 13, 2017

Founder of:

Review Provided By New Age Music Reviews

Tracks:
01. Deep
02. Dare to Dream
03. Resonance
04. Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep
05. My Sacred Inner Child
06. Riding the Winds of Change (Instrumental)
07. Trust (And Let Go)
08. You Give Me Strength
09. A New Day
10. A Journey Within (Instrumental)
11. Onward to Glory
12. Moonlight Waltz (Instrumental)

 

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